Dentures

When poor oral health or injury claims most or all of a person’s natural teeth, Dr. Marin often suggests dentures. Modern dentures look and feel more natural than in previous generations, and they allow a person to eat, speak, and smile just as if they have a full set of healthy, natural teeth. We can secure dentures with adhesive on the top and bottom arches, or with a closed-palate denture and natural suction on the top arch. However, many patients opt for the more secure and long-lasting option of dental implant-supported dentures.

Dentures

Types of Dentures

  • Conventional: This full removable denture is made and placed in your mouth after the remaining teeth are removed and tissues have healed, which may take several months.
  • Immediate: This removable denture is inserted on the same day that the remaining teeth are removed. Your dentist will take measurements and make models of your jaw during a preliminary visit. You don’t have to be without teeth during the healing period but may need to have the denture relined or remade after your jaw has healed.
  • Overdenture: Sometimes some of your teeth can be saved to preserve your jawbone and provide stability and support for the denture. An overdenture fits over a small number of remaining natural teeth after they have been prepared by your dentist. Implants can serve the same function, too.

How to care for your Dentures

Like your teeth, your dentures should be brushed daily to remove food particles and plaque. Brushing also can help keep the teeth from staining.

  • Rinse your dentures before brushing to remove any loose food or debris.
  • Use a soft-bristle toothbrush and a non-abrasive cleanser to gently brush all the surfaces of the dentures so they don’t get scratched.
  • When brushing, clean your mouth thoroughly—including your gums, cheeks, the roof of your mouth, and tongue to remove any plaque. This can help reduce the risk of oral irritation and bad breath.
  • When you’re not wearing your dentures, put them in a safe place covered in water to keep them from warping.
  • Occasionally, denture wearers may use adhesives. Adhesives come in many forms: creams, powders, pads/wafers, strips, or liquids. If you use one of these products, read the instructions, and use them exactly as directed. Your dentist can recommend appropriate cleansers and adhesives; look for products with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Products with the ADA Seal have been evaluated for safety and effectiveness.